Highland Humanist Weddings

Terri & Michael’s Humanist Wedding at Bogbain Farm

October 1, 2014 | Author: admin | Filed under: Highland Humanist Wedding,Scottish Humanist Wedding

The guests stood up and Terri and Michael entered the room together, followed by their Bridesmaids, Best Man and Ringbearer – the latter a very important person, Terri’s son K (who carried out his responsibilities superbly throughout the ceremony – you can see his ID card in the photo!) After welcoming everyone and introducing humanism and myself, I […]

Mr & Mrs, K and a tractor!

Mr & Mrs, with K and a tractor!

The guests stood up and Terri and Michael entered the room together, followed by their Bridesmaids, Best Man and Ringbearer – the latter a very important person, Terri’s son K (who carried out his responsibilities superbly throughout the ceremony – you can see his ID card in the photo!)

After welcoming everyone and introducing humanism and myself, I drew attention to the two candles that were burning in memory of Michael’s much-loved grandpa and dad, which would include them in the ceremony and in our thoughts. I continued: Michael and Terri stand before you today on the threshold of a new and exciting phase in their relationship. They told me that they met through mutual friends and at the time the two of them were equally bonkers! They found that not only was everything more fun when they were together, but also that very early on they knew they wanted the same things in life, and they couldn’t wait to start living their lives together.

We’d decided to keep the wedding relatively short and sweet, partly because of nerves and the recent bereavement, but the ceremony was heartfelt and meaningful, especially their ‘Three things I love’ (kept secret from one another until then). They’d chosen a reading, handfasting, promises, and of course their exchange of legal vows and wedding rings.

First, an introduction to Handfasting: ‘Tying the knot’ is a symbol traditionally used at wedding ceremonies in Celtic as well as in other cultures. I’ll be binding you together with these ties, which symbolise the bond of marriage. In the old days, stating in front of witnesses your commitment to one another while hand-fasted, the community recognised you as a married couple. Then, the binding of hands: This bond is made by Michael’s love for Terri, This bond is made by Terri’s love for Michael, This bond is made by the love that your family and friends have for you and the love shared by you all. And, as this knot binds your hands, so too may your hearts be joined.

For their vows, some couples read from a script, some repeat-after-me. Others phrase their promises as questions I can ask, and this is what Michael and Terri had chosen to do. I said: As part of their preparations for today, Terri and Michael discussed what they wanted to promise one another on their wedding day. They’re now going to make those promises, after which they’ll exchange their legal vows and wedding rings. Terri and Michael, in front of everyone here today, you are about to pledge your love and commitment. I’m going to ask you four questions, and after each one could you please answer together, ‘We will.’ 1) Will you love one another through both the good times and the bad, always putting one another and your family first? ‘We will.’ 2) Will you try to be understanding and open with one another, trusting as well as worthy of each other’s trust? ‘We will.’ 3) Will you share your dreams and support one another to achieve your goals, and walk hand in hand, heart to heart, wherever life may take you? ‘We will.’ 4) Will you be equal partners in a loving, honest relationship and remain faithful to your vows for as long as you both shall live? ‘We will.’

Bogbain Farm is deservedly popular for weddings nowadays and I was pleased to be there again. The ceremony room is atmospheric, with its dark walls and spotlights, and the seating of straw bales (the cloths make them comfortable and prevent itching!), and everyone loves the rustic touches (e.g.  jam jars for glasses – see photo). Best of all, it’s well-run and welcoming.

All the best to a lovely young family!

No comments as yet.

Anonymous - Gravatar

No comments have yet been made to this posting.

Leave A Comment

All fields marked with "*" are required.